Search Episodes
Listen, Share, & Support
Listen to the latest episode
Subscribe via iTunes
Subscribe via RSS
Become a fan
Follow on Twitter

Support Us:

Please consider making a donation to help make this podcast possible. Any contribution, great or small, helps tremendously!

 
Subscribe to E-Mail Updates

Related Readings
  • Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life
    Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to A More Meaningful Life
    by Massimo Pigliucci
  • Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science from Bunk
    Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science from Bunk
    by Massimo Pigliucci
  • Denying Evolution: Creationism, Scientism, and the Nature of Science
    Denying Evolution: Creationism, Scientism, and the Nature of Science
    by Massimo Pigliucci
Friday
Jun122015

RS136 - David Roodman on Why Microfinance Won't Cure Global Poverty

Release date: June 15, 2015

David RoodmanCan we pull the world's poor out of poverty by giving them access to financial services? This episode features a conversation with economist David Roodman, formerly a fellow at the Center for Global Development and senior advisor to the Gates Foundation, currently senior advisor to the Open Philanthropy Project, and the author of Due Diligence: An Impertinent Inquiry into Microfinance.

Roodman casts a critical eye on the hype about microfinance as a panacea for global poverty. He and Julia explore why it's hard to design a good study, even a randomized one; three different conceptions of "development,"; and why Roodman doesn't think we should give up on microfinance altogether.

David's pick:  "Political Order and Political Decay: From the Industrial Revolution to the Globalization of Democracy" 

NEW: Full Transcripts 


Thanks to Rationally Speaking listener Brent Silk, for help with post-production.

Reader Comments (4)

I think "Goodman" in the second to last line should be corrected to "Roodman."
June 16, 2015 | Unregistered Commenteranon
6% improvement in attendance? Is this significant enough? Could it be just a random chance?
March 23, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterMatus Choma
Sad to hear microfinance didn't work out as expected. If it had worked really well, and sustained itself, it might have provided a method to end poverty everywhere.

Probably it makes more sense to invest in contraception and education (especially female) than most other types of philanthropy. Microfinance abuse apparently includes such as loan sharking (usury interest rates), abusive debt collection practices, and the simple fact that poor people have trouble repaying loans. Perhaps then we should simply give, without exception of repayment, small amounts of capital to poor people directly, bypassing lenders and governments. Along with small gifts we might include communications and information equipment such as a smart phone and wireless internet service, as well and education in finance.
December 17, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterJameson
I guess this idea had some good intentions but sadly just thinking that more money in people's hand will "fix" things was not really getting to the heart of the problems here. And that's all about how these Society's are lacking in relevant Infrastructure support. Their Politics, Education, Law, Economy, Health etc. organization & structure is highly underdeveloped and lacks the critical stability & sufficiency to be able to provide the needed investment in these people's lives so that they could make the most of these opportunities to build a reliable & prosperous Economic future.
January 3, 2018 | Unregistered CommenterErnesto

PostPost a New Comment

Enter your information below to add a new comment.

My response is on my own website »
Author Email (optional):
Author URL (optional):
Post:
 
All HTML will be escaped. Hyperlinks will be created for URLs automatically.