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Sunday
Nov122017

RS 197 - Doug Hubbard on “Why people think some things can’t be quantified (and why they’re wrong)”

Release date: November 12th, 2017

Doug Hubbard

In this episode Julia talks with Doug Hubbard, author of "How to Measure Anything," about why people so often believe things are impossible to quantify like "innovation" or "quality of life." For example, because people often have a deep misunderstanding of the meaning of probability. Or because they're reluctant to violate "sacred taboos" by putting a number on something like the value of human life. Or because it feels vulgar to "reduce" important things to a number. Doug explains how he responds to these objections and others.

Doug's Pick: "Innumeracy" by John Allen Paulos

Doug's 2nd Pick: "Decision Traps" by J. Edward Russo and Paul J.H. Shoemaker

Doug's Book: "How to Meassure Anything"

Edited by Brent Silk

Music by Miracles of Modern Science

 

Full Transcripts 

Reader Comments (6)

Download Norton Antivirus from https://goo.gl/C1dGTS and after installing or re-installing you face any error call toll free +1-855-550-9333.
November 16, 2017 | Unregistered Commenteralex khushi
Can't measure position and velocity, or time and frequency with high accuracy at the same time.
November 16, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterMax
Try measuring the IQ of different ethnic groups these days and see what happens.
November 18, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterMax
Really Smart Stuff. Not sure about the strict mathematical probability (frequency), but as a common sense probability, we know that there is less than about a .02% that our sandwich is poisoned, or else we would not eat it.

Also, Doug's estimate of $11M for a human life seems a bit high. The 2015 US Census puts average income at $56,516 annually. If we assume the average person puts in 40 years of work, and then also multiply by a factor of three to represent all the sleep time and recreation time people enjoy as well, we get $6,782,000. This may seem "vulgar", but lawyers do this all the time in wrongful death lawsuits where someone dies due to an accident or negligence. Of course, some people may dislike lawyers.
November 20, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterJameson
Oh, great, your article gives me useful information and a fresh perspective on the subject.
November 20, 2017 | Unregistered Commenterabc ya
Love to have the citation for the Kahneman reference regarding naivety and inference, I think it was.
November 22, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterJason Steere

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