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Monday
Jun122017

RS 186 - Tania Lombrozo on “Why we evolved the urge to explain”

Release date: June 11th, 2017

Tania Lombrozo

Humans have an innate urge to reach for explanations of the world around us. For example, "What caused this tragedy?" or "Why are some people successful?" This episode features psychologist and philosopher Tania Lombrozo, discussing her research on what purpose explanation serves -- i.e., why it helps us more than our brains just running prediction algorithms. Tania and Julia also discuss whether simple explanations are more likely to be true, and why we're drawn to teleological explanations (e.g., "Why does the sun shine? So that plants can grow.")

Tania's Website: Tania Lombrozo

Blog #1 Tania Contributes to: "13.7 Cosmos and Culture"

Blog #2 Tania Contributes to: "Explananda"

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Tania's Pick: "Language and Thought" by Noam Chomsky

Tania's Other Pick: "The Language Instinct" by Steven Pinker

Edited by Brent Silk

Music by Miracles of Modern Science

 

Full Transcripts 

Reader Comments (5)

The mp3 download link is linking to the previous episode right now.
June 12, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterMax
When I was little, I asked "What for" a lot, like "What do trees sway for?" I thought trees create wind like a hand fan. My parents explained that I had cause and effect backwards, and that I should ask "Why" instead of "What for." They also told me about a centipede that tried to explain how it walks and immediately tripped. Seems related to verbal overshadowing and to overthinking in sports.
June 15, 2017 | Unregistered CommenterMax
This is great websites, I visited some of them but I didn't know that Google offers free games.And this is I play free flash games in this websites.
http://earntodie.co/
June 15, 2017 | Unregistered Commenterearn to die
Humans have an innate urge to reach for explanations of the world around us. I agree with you. Sometime i have question seem like crazy such as why some human is selfish but another not same? Want to go far, go together but want to go fast, go alone ? People successful should go alone or go together? Thank this article make me information clearer.
June 20, 2017 | Unregistered Commentertrump twitter

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