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Rationally Speaking is the official podcast of New York City Skeptics. Join Julia Galef and guests as they explore the borderlands between reason and nonsense, likely and unlikely, science and pseudoscience. Rationally Speaking was co-created with Massimo Pigliucci.

Current Episodes


Sunday
Jan102016

RS 150 - Elizabeth Loftus on "The malleability of human memory"

Release date: January 10, 2016

Elizabeth Loftus

Do you remember when you were a kid, and you had that great day at Disneyland where you got to meet Bugs Bunny? No? Think harder. It was a sunny day... 

In this episode of Rationally Speaking, Julia interviews psychologist Elizabeth Loftus, whose pioneering work on human memory revealed that our memories can be contaminated by the questions people ask us, or by misinformation we encounter after the fact -- even to the point of making us remember entire events that never could have happened. (Like meeting Bugs Bunny, a Warner Bros character, at Disneyland.)

Elizabeth's Pick: "Missing: The Execution of Charles Horman" by Thomas Hauser

Podcast edited by Brent Silk

 

 

 

Full Transcripts 

 

Sunday
Dec272015

Happy Holidays

Happy Holidays to all of our listeners! We are taking a short break, but we will be back with a new episode on Jan 10th.

Sunday
Dec132015

RS 149 - Susan Gelman on "How essentialism shapes our thinking"

Release date: December 13, 2015

Susan GelmanIn this episode, psychologist Susan Gelman describes her work on the psychological trait of essentialism: the innate human urge to categorize reality and to assume that those categories reflect meaningful, invisible differences. Julia and Susan discuss why the discovery of essentialism in children was such a surprise to scientists, how the language we use affects the way we view reality, and whether essentialism is to blame for bad philosophy.

Susan's Pick: "The Bad Seed" by William March

Susan's Book: "Essential Child"

Podcast edited by Brent Silk

 

 

Full Transcripts